Monday, January 25, 2016

Dick Haymes...Soft Lights and Sweet Music



Dick Haymes was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina in 1918. He became a vocalist in a number of big bands, worked in Hollywood, on radio, and in films throughout the 1940's/1950's.

Though never achieving the immensely popular status of fellow baritone crooners like Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, or Perry Como, Haymes was nonetheless just as respected for his musical ability. On September 3, 1942, Sinatra introduced Haymes on radio as Sinatra's replacement in the Tommy Dorsey band. Prior to joining Dorsey's group, Haymes sang with the Harry James orchestra.

In 1945 Haymes co-starred with Jeanne Crain, Dana Andrews and Vivian Blaine in the musical State Fair. He teamed with female vocalist Helen Forrest for many hit duets during World War Two, including "Together," "I'll Buy That Dream," and "Long Ago and Far Away"; he sang with Judy Garland on two Decca recordings of songs from the film The Shocking Miss Pilgrim, in which he appeared with Betty Grable.

He paired repeatedly with the Andrews Sisters (Patty, Maxene, and LaVerne) on a dozen or so Decca collaborations, including the Billboard hit "Teresa," "Great Day," "My Sin," and a 1952 rendering of the dramatic ballad "Here in My Heart," backed by the sisters and Nelson Riddle's lush strings. His duets with Patty Andrews were also well received, both on Decca vinyl and on radio's Club Fifteen with the sisters, which he hosted in 1949 and 1950. He also joined Bing Crosby and The Andrews Sisters for 1947 session that produced the Billboard hit "There's No Business Like Show Business," as well as "Anything You Can Do (I Can Do Better)." His popular renditions of tender ballads such as "Little White Lies" and "Maybe It's Because" were recorded with celebrated arranger Gordon Jenkins and his orchestra and chorus.






                                         



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Monday, January 18, 2016

Ma Cherie Amour...Essential French Crooners...40 Popular Chansons



This 40 track collection of French chansonniers will take you back to the heady days of the early to mid 20th Century when the cafes of Paris were alive with singing and dancing and the celebrated Rive Gauche was the place to be. 

This selection of singers and their trademark songs featuring Serge Gainsbourg, Charles Aznavour, Edith Piaf and Jacques Brel, will explain why French popular music of the period continues to exert an enduring appeal.









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